DIY
Gamer
Kit
 
Lay everything out on the table
PCB
Start Button
Push Buttons
Header Pins
DIL Sockets
Integrated Circuit (8 Bit Shift Register)
Integrated Circuit (LED Driver)
Matrix Sockets
LED Matrix
Buzzer
LED (Red)
Spare LED (Green)
Infrared Transmitter (Blue)
Infrared Receiver
Front Acrylic
Back Acrylic
1k ohm Resistor
Start Switch
Nuts
Bolts (2 long, 3 short)
Spacers (2 long, 3 short)
Arduino Uno
USB Cable
9v Battery Contacts
9v Battery
Not included
Lanyard
Turn your soldering iron on at 300º (or 572ºF)
It can take up to 10 minutes for your iron to heat up.

A soldering iron can cause harm if not handled correctly, follow these rules and you'll be safe.
If you get burnt, put your finger in cold water for 10 minutes
Tie long hair back to keep it out of the way
Use goggles to protect your eyes
Wet your sponge
Ignore this step if your soldering iron does not have a sponge.
Hold your iron like a pencil
When you're done using it, put it back in the cradle.
Find the hottest side of your iron by melting a little bit of solder
Try rotating it until you find the hottest part.
Find the PCB
A PCB (Printed Circuit Board) has been specially designed with metal lines and pads that connect together.

When you connect components into them with solder, electrical connections are made.
Find the Push Buttons
A button completes a circuit allowing electricity to flow when pressed, and breaks the circuit, stopping the flow when unpressed.
Snap them into the PCB
Flip PCB and secure with tac so it doesn't move
This keeps the PCB steady while soldering.
Solder all buttons
Having trouble soldering?

Check out our how-to videos »
Check your solder joints
A good solder joint should look like a pyramid and the gold pad should be completely covered with solder.

Having trouble soldering?

Check out our how-to videos »
Find the Start button
This is the same as the other buttons, just smaller.

It completes a circuit allowing electricity to flow when pressed, and breaks the circuit stopping the flow when unpressed.
Snap it into the PCB
Flip the PCB and solder
Find the DIL sockets
A DIL (dual in line) socket is a little holder for the Integrated Circuits. These are soldered onto the board so that we can then slot the Integrated Circuit into them.

They protect the ICs from heat when soldering and also means they can be replaced quickly and easily.
Place them on the PCB
The notch should be at the top to remind us to the place the chips in the right way round.
Flip the PCB and solder
These really don't like staying in to be soldered, so carefully secure with tac, being careful not to get it stuck in the socket holes.
Find the IC chips
An IC (Integrated Circuit) is a whole circuit in itself, but very very small and made of silicon.

These 2 ICs look very similar but you will notice they have different codes printed on them and do very different things:

MIC 5891 is an 8-Bit Shift Register

TLC 5916 is the LED Driver
Gently bend the IC legs on your table so they are perpendicular
Place each row of legs on a hard flat surface and gently press to bend the legs equally.

This will help them slot easily into the DIL socket

They are very delicate, if you bent them in a funny way, slowly nudge them back into place.
Push the ICs into the DIL sockets
Check the notches on the IC are located at the top, the same as the DIL socket.
FIND THE LED MATRIX AND THE LED MATRIX SOCKETS
An LED matrix or LED display is a low-resolution display made up of an array (grid) of LEDs. You'll use the sockets to connect the matrix to the PCB.
Slot the LED matrix pins into the sockets
Slot them in the PCB
Flip PCB over and solder
Remove the LED Matrix
We need to temporarily remove it so that we can solder more components underneath it.
Find your Resistor
A resistor is used in a circuit to restrict the flow of electrical current.

Some limit the flow more than others. The colour bands tell us their resistance value. The resistance is measured in Ohms.

The 1K resistor will control the brightness of the LED matrix screen.
Bend legs into a U shape
Use a flat hard surface like your desk or table to bend the legs against. This will give you a nice crisp corner.
Place in PCB
Flip PCB and solder
Snip legs
Hold the snips flat side down and snip just above the top of the solder joint.

Remember to hold the leg to stop it pinging off.
Find the Header Pins
A Header pin simply fits into a socket to make an electrical connection, like a wire.
Push them into your Arduino
They should fit perfectly into the sockets with no spare pins.
Slot your PCB onto the pins
The short side of the pins should fit perfectly through series of holes on the outside of the PCB.

By connecting them to the Arduino first, it ensures the pins are straight and that the Arduino can be easily attached and detached
Solder all the pins
Test Time! Plug your LED Matrix in
Connect the Arduino to a computer with the USB cable
The USB will be supplying the power and the screen should switch on! If it doesn't:

- Jiggle every component with your finger. If it moves, solder it again. Make sure the gold pads is completely covered with solder.

- Check if the IC's are in the right orientation.
Disconnect the Arduino and the LED Matrix
Find your Buzzer
This Low Profile Buzzer produces programmable sounds.

The different legs tell us it has polarity and must be placed in the circuit the right way round. The long leg is the positive leg.
Place it on the PCB
Make sure the long legs is in the hole marked with a + sign.
Flip PCB and Solder
Find the LED
An LED is a basic light . The different legs tell us it has polarity and must be placed in the circuit the right way round. The long leg is the positive leg.
Place it on the PCB
Make sure the long legs is in the hole marked with the + sign.
Flip PCB, solder and snip.
Find the Infrared Transmitter
An infrared TX (transmitter) is an LED that emits a light signal just beyond red in the colour spectrum that humans can not see.

It can send Infrared signals to another Gamer.

The different legs tell us it has polarity and must be placed in the circuit the right way round. The long leg is the positive leg.
Place on the PCB
This LED has polarity, make sure the long legs is in the hole marked with a + sign.

DO NOT SOLDER YET!
Bend to 90°
This points the infrared light out of the top, making it easier to be received by another Gamer.
Flip PCB, solder and snip
Find the Infrared RX
The Infrared RX (Receiver) is the other half of the multi-player components. This receives a light signal just beyond red in the colour spectrum that humans not see.

It will be able to pick up Infrared signals from another Gamer or another device.
Place it on the PCB
This infrared RX has polarity, make sure the rounded face is pointing outwards.
Flip PCB, solder and snip
Find the Battery Clips
These connect to a 9 volt battery.

The clip with a hexagonal connector is the positive(+) side and the one with a smaller circular connector is the negative(-) side.
Push the battery clips through the back-side of PCB.
Push the clips so the pins poke right through the opposite side of the board.

This may be hard, but carefully apply force until they go through.
Solder the 6 battery clips legs
These will need a lot of heating and solder.
Flip PCB and solder from the front-side.
This will make the front smooth as well as making the battery clips very secure.
Find the Power Switch
A switch completes the circuit allowing electricity to flow when flicked on, and breaks the circuit stopping the flow when flicked off.
Place on the PCB
Make sure the switch is facing out.
Flip PCB and solder
Connect your Arduino and LED Matrix
Electronics Complete!
Time to put the battery in and turn it on!

If it works: you can now play the pre-loaded games.

It doesn't: check the previous steps to work out what's wrong.
Find the front casing:
1 front acrylic
2 long bolts
2 long spacers
2 nuts
Disconnect the Arduino from the board
Push the long bolts through the holes in the acrylic
Fit the spacers from the other side.
Hold the nuts with your fingers and screw the bolts in
Find the back casing:
1 acrylic, 3 bolts, 3 short spacers, 3 nuts
Push the long bolts through the holes in the acrylic
Fit the small spacers from the other side
Slot the Arduino onto the bolts
Using finger, loosely fit nuts
Hold the nuts with your fingers and screw the bolts in
Clip the battery in
Plug the front to the back
Check that all the header pins are slotted into the Arduino sockets before pushing.
Turn it on and GEEK OUT!
There are plenty of games you can install and play in your Gamer.

When you're done, you can hack and change them.

Or maybe you'll invent your own.

Go to the next step to find out how to program your Arduino.
Yeah! You built your kit!
But we’re just getting started. To complete your kit, we’re going to teach you how to make the most out of your kit.


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